Structural Commentary — Ode to the West Wind, Percy Bysshe Shelley

What's this? Another ode? You may be wondering what my fascination with this form is. I acknowledge that by having two of the same form of poetry in a row could give this blog a one-note feel to it, but I can explain! You see, we analyzed John Keats's "Ode to a Nightingale" in class, … Continue reading Structural Commentary — Ode to the West Wind, Percy Bysshe Shelley

Structural Commentary – Ode to a Nightingale, John Keats

In class, we discussed and analyzed "Ode to a Nightingale" by John Keats (1819). Unfortunately, time only allowed us to barely skim the surface of the poem, so I thought I'd try my hand at analyzing it myself. Bear with me, since I'm still trying to get the hang of this whole poetry blogging thing! … Continue reading Structural Commentary – Ode to a Nightingale, John Keats

5 Book Recommendations for National Book Lover’s Day

I'll break up my usual every-other-Sunday routine for a special occasion. In this case, it's because it is a national holiday, National Book Lover's Day! As a bibliophile myself, I thought there were be something inherently wrong if my blog didn't feature a book for this incredibly important holiday. I'm very happy to say I've … Continue reading 5 Book Recommendations for National Book Lover’s Day

4 Pictures That Define Cosmopolitanism

For the past four weeks, I've been taking an online class called Culture & Identity in World Politics through my school, the University of Denver. Throughout the course, we've been reading about and discussing what makes up an identity, what makes us who we are, and how it applies to the rest of the world. We're concluding the course on cosmopolitanism, a school of thought that basically means you don't identify with any one place or culture, but rather you consider yourself a citizen of the world. Our final assignment is to compile a set of images that representing cosmopolitanism. Here are four photos that represent cosmopolitanism.